Posts tagged #Clyde Ormond

Clyde Ormond – Survival Fishing Kit

Clyde Ormond's Otudoorsman's Handbook

Clyde Ormond's Otudoorsman's Handbook

It's interesting when looking at VHD site stats, just how and where people come from to get here. For some reason the VHD picks up a lot of traffic from people searching for "Survival Fishing Kits," a subject that I've never gone into, until now. Now that winter has set in, and course fishing is largely out of season, it's time to make one, and where better to start than Clyde Ormond's survival fishing kit? It's no secret he is one of myoutdoors heroes and luckily his writings contain a lot about fishing.  His survival fishing kit from "The Outdoorsman's Handbook" is as follows.

Dozen fly hooks 10-yard roll of mono filament fishing line Small bobbin of silk thread 6 Paper clips

The 12 hooks should be of assorted sizes, ranging from #12–#4. They should be of the wet-fly types, and of good quality. The majority of hooks should be of average size #6, #8, #10 ...

Half a dozen wooden matches, paraffin dipped to be waterproof, should be included to start a fire for cooking the fish. The entire kit will fit into a plastic envelope, which should be sealed tightly with plastic tape. If it is sewed into the pocket of your fishing jacket, you’ll be sure not to leave it behind when you venture into remote areas.
— Clyde Ormond - The Outdoorsman's Handbook, 1975
Clyde Ormond's Survival Fishing Kit

Clyde Ormond's Survival Fishing Kit

At the time of writing, Ormond speaks confidently about using this minimal kit in the lesser travelled wilderness areas to easily catch fish. The included paper clips are for constructing make-shift rod guides, which can be lashed to a branch or pole, and the silk thread can be used to make flies–on the fly, so to speak. As well as Ormond's previously featured emergency clothes-pin lure, he also has instructions for tying emergency flies by hand, using equipment in this kit along with everyday scavenged items, everything from scraps of shirttail and aluminium foil, to his own chest hair and found eagle feathers. I'm hoping to try these out in the future.

Clyde Ormond's Survival Fishing Kit

Clyde Ormond's Survival Fishing Kit

So here we have it, I don't have a fishing jacket, as-such, but this can now live in my hiking and fishing ditty bag, just incase.

Posted on February 25, 2013 and filed under Gear List.

Clyde Ormond - Clothespin Bass Plug

Homemade fishing gear

Homemade fishing gear

Is there anything more satisfying than catching a fish? How about catching a fish on a homemade lure. I've never really ventured into the world of homemade fishing gear but, as with a lot of my posts, I came across a great article in an outdoor book and had to give it a try. In Clyde Ormond's fantastic "Complete Book of Outdoor Lore" he devotes a whole chapter to makeshift lures. The most intriguing and coolest looking being the clothespin bass plug.

Clothespin Bass Plug

Clothespin Bass Plug

(1) Start with an old fashioned clothespin. (2) Flatten the top of the knob and burn a small dent at partition center with hot wire to keep hook from slipping. Tie hook between prongs with monofilament, bringing it from top and bottom and knotting it along the side. Then loop it around the neck. (3) and tie on top of plug. Burn eyes into the head. Plug should be charred along top to simulate shading, and “scales” can be added by chipping lightly with a knife blade (4).
— Clyde Ormond - Complete Book of Outdoor Lore, 1969

Ormond is one of my favorite outdoor authors, I find myself re-visiting his books time and time again. His instructions are a little vague but I managed to fashion something that looked pretty similar. I burnt the top and the eyes, tried to get as much contrast my scrapping the pin to reveal new wood. I also spent a long time fashioning the scales and did a little nimble knot work. It could be tidier but I am rather proud of it.

My Finished Clothespin Bass Plug

My Finished Clothespin Bass Plug

It swam very well, I was casting from a canoe and it bobbed along beautifully. I also trawled it behind for a time. I feel the bass where I fish in Maine are a little whiley and the further afield I get the better success I might have. It was still a real pleasure fishing with homemade gear, especially one so whacky looking. Rest assured there will be pictures if I have any success with it.

Posted on September 7, 2012 and filed under Classic Kit.

Clyde Ormond's 1964 Gear List

Clyde Ormond's Gear List from The Complete Book of Outdoor Lore

Clyde Ormond's Gear List from The Complete Book of Outdoor Lore

A fascinating gear list from Clyde Ormond's 1964 publication, the "Complete Book of Outdoor Lore." This list is for a single hiker, travelling in mild weather.

The basic items will be:

Packboard, 3 pounds or less. Ax, 2½ pounds. Sleeping Bag, 4 pounds. Cooking and eating utensils, 2 pounds. Down vest, ½ pound. Raincoat, ½ pound. Underwear, shirts, socks, 2 pounds. Camera and film, 2½ pounds. Tarp, 2 pounds. Emergency Kit , ½ pound. Whetstone, matches, toothbrush, first-aid kit, etc, ½ pound. Miscellaneous, 2 pounds.

In addition, the hiker may want to carry a fishing rod, rifle, handgun, or binoculars.

The ax should have a single-bit, 1½ pound head, and a leather sheath. It won’t exceed 2 ½ pounds.
— Clyde Ormond - The Complete Book of Outdoor Lore, 1964

This is an exquisite book, and I will be sharing more of it's gems. If you come across a copy it is well worth picking up.

Posted on October 30, 2011 and filed under Gear List.